Five Warning Signs of Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

Do you know someone who may be affected by Alzheimer’s disease? We’re here to help you understand the symptoms and warning signs.

June 18, 2019 | HF Healthy Living Team

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It’s a degenerative brain disease, which means it gets worse over time. Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease can occur before the age of 65, and precautions should be taken if its symptoms occur.

Schedule an appointment with your doctor if you recognize any of the warning signs below. Be sure to check out our post on overcoming burnout and stress as a caregiver as well.

Click the photos below to learn about some of the warning signs of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Memory Loss that Affects Daily Life

Memory Loss that
Affects Daily Life

 

Memory Loss that Affects Daily Life

Do you often forget recently learned information? Or maybe you’re having difficulty making plans or solving problems. These are common warning signs of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. You might experience difficulty concentrating and take longer to do things than you once did.

 

Confusion, Usually of Time and Place

Confusion, Usually of
Time and Place

 

Confusion, Usually of Time and Place

People with early-onset Alzheimer’s can often forget dates and seasons. They might also find it difficult to complete tasks at home or at work, such as managing a budget or remembering the rules of a once-familiar game. Take this quiz on Alzheimer’s disease to learn more.

 

Vision or Speaking Problems

Vision or Speaking Problems

 

Vision or Speaking Problems

People who have Alzheimer’s might have issues with driving, with reading, or with following a conversation. It’s possible they might have problems coming up with the right word, or they might even stop talking in the middle of a conversation. Find out more about older driver safety and how to stay protected here.

 

Poor Judgement and Misplacing Items

Poor Judgement and
Misplacing Items

 

Poor Judgement and Misplacing Items

A person with Alzheimer’s might place things in unusual spots, and when unable to find them later might even accuse others of stealing. They could also lack good judgement in cleanliness and overall decision making. If you know someone without health insurance who has these symptoms, learn about Medicare here.

 

Changes in Mood and Activities

Changes in Mood
and Activities

 

Changes in Mood and Activities

People who have Alzheimer’s might have trouble performing their favorite activities or hobbies. They might even undergo a change in personality. Common symptoms of mood changes include confusion, depression, fearfulness, and anxiety.

 
 

© 2019 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“If You Have Younger-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease,” Alzheimer’s Association. May 30, 2019.
https://www.alz.org/help-support/i-have-alz/younger-onset

“Alzheimer’s Disease Fact Sheet,” National Institute on Aging. May 30, 2019.
https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/alzheimers-disease-fact-sheet

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