Reading to your Child

Why You Should Read to Your Child

Do you know why it is important to read to your child every day? Find out here!

May 18, 2016 | HF Healthy Living Team

Did you know that reading to your child for as little as 20 minutes a day can help with memory, learning, and school success? In fact, experts say you should read to your child because it is the most important activity for language development in kids. Reading plays the biggest role in learning for children from ages two to five, but it is important at all ages. Here are some of the great ways reading aloud can help your child succeed.

Click the photos below to learn more about the importance of reading to your child.

Reading to your child Teaches Language and Speech Skills
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Teaches Language and Speech Skills

 

Reading to your child Teaches Language and Speech Skills
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By learning new and longer words from books, your child will learn how speech and language works. S/he will be better able to express him or herself and better able to talk with friends, teachers, and you.

 

Reading to your child Improves Success at School
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Improves Success at School

 

Reading to your child Improves Success at School
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Better language skills will help your child understand his or her teacher and learn more at school, and lower his or her risk of dropping out later on.
Reading aloud can also improve your child’s listening skills, motivation, curiosity, attention span, and ability to concentrate.

 

Reading to your child helps with new experiences
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Helps with New Experiences

 

Reading to your child helps with new experiences
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Books can help your child understand changes, challenges, and fears that s/he may face. If your child is starting school or is afraid of the doctor, a story about the topic may help your child understand what to expect and how to cope with stress. By reading aloud, you can learn together.

 

Reading to your child makes your more connected
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Makes You More Connected

 

Reading to your child makes your more connected
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Reading to your child will give him or her what s/he needs most from you: your care and attention. Reading to your kids turns a learning experience into a special time that you can share.

 

Reading to your child makes builds a lifelong habit
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Builds a Lifelong Habit

 

Reading to your child makes builds a lifelong habit
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As your child gets used to reading with you, s/he will feel more comfortable with books and will read more on his or her own.
By reading with your child every day, you are helping him or her develop a habit that will lead to better learning and success throughout his or her life.

 

Getting Started

Start reading with your child when s/he is six months old. Begin with picture books that have images that your child can look at and point to, and eventually name. As your child’s learning and language improves, move on to more advanced books.

If your child is older than six months, don’t worry. You can start reading together at any age.

The New York Public Library has children’s books you can borrow for no cost. Find an NYPL branch near you here.

If your child is between six months and five years old, you can get a book for free after your child’s well-child visit through the Reach Out and Read program. Find a location where you can get a book here.


 

© 2016 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“Importance of Reading Aloud,” Reach Out and Read. Accessed January 14, 2016.
http://reachoutandread.org/our-story/importance-of-reading-aloud/

“Reading, Literacy and Your Child,” University of Michigan Health System. Updated October 2010.
http://www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/reading.htm

“The Hidden Benefits of Reading Aloud—Even for Older Kids,” GreatKids. Accessed January 14, 2016.
http://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/read-aloud-to-children/

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