Veggie Stock Recipe

Recipe: Three Ways to Make Veggie Stock

Homemade veggie stock is healthy, low-cost, and earth-friendly. Here are three recipes for you to try.

April 11, 2019 | HF Healthy Living Team

This is a guest post from Lisa Suriano, founder of Veggiecation®, a premier school food service consulting company for independent schools.

Homemade vegetable stock is so simple that you’ll wonder why you’ve never done it before. Not only is it easy, but making your own veggie stock will save you money, lower your salt intake, and reduce food waste.

Creating your own vegetable stock not only benefits your wallet, your body, and the earth, but vegetable stock is a major flavor booster, so using it will have a delicious impact on your food.

You can use vegetable stock to make rice, pasta, sauce, sautés, and more!

Getting Started

Save vegetable scraps (the ends and peels of vegetables) from food prep during the week and store in a bag or jar in the freezer. When you have about 4–6 cups of scraps, or enough to fill half a medium pot, you’re ready to start.

Scraps to Keep
Celery, onions, carrots, garlic, mushrooms

Herbs to Add for Flavor
Parsley, cilantro, thyme, ginger, cloves, rosemary, basil, bay leaves. Use your favorites!

Thinking Outside the Box
Sweet potato, leeks, fennel, asparagus, eggplant, potatoes, corn cobs, squash, kale stems

Avoid
Leafy vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bok choy (they tend to make stock sour), and anything rotten

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Simple Veggie Stock

Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 4 –6 cups of vegetable scraps
  • 6 –8 cups of water
  • Herbs of choice

Instructions

  1. Add vegetable scraps to a large pot and cover them with water.
  2. Bring water to a boil. When water reaches boiling, reduce to a simmer.
  3. Let the pot simmer for 45 minutes to one hour, but no longer. (The longer you cook the vegetables in water, the more bitter the stock.)
  4. Strain stock and allow to cool.
  5. Freeze stock in jars or ice cube trays, or use right away to make rice, cook pasta, boil soup, or prepare a vegetable sauté.
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Flavor Boost Veggie Stock

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1–2 cloves garlic chopped
  • 4–6 cups of vegetable scraps ends and peels
  • 6–8 cups of water
  • Herbs

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450 F.
  2. Toss vegetable scraps with olive oil and garlic and spread evenly on a roasting pan or cookie sheet.
  3. Roast scraps for up to 30 minutes or until slightly browned.
  4. Add vegetable scraps to a large pot and cover them with water.
  5. Bring water to a boil. When water reaches boiling, reduce to a simmer.
  6. Let the pot simmer for 45 minutes to one hour, but no longer. (The longer you cook the vegetables in water, the more bitter the stock.)
  7. Strain stock and allow to cool.
  8. Freeze stock in jars or ice cube trays, or use right away to make rice, cook pasta, boil soup, or prepare a vegetable sauté.
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Sweet Tooth Veggie Stock

Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 55 minutes
Total Time 1 hour

Ingredients

  • 4–6 cups of naturally sweet vegetable scraps carrots, onions, fruit
  • 1–2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 6–8 cups of water
  • Herbs

Instructions

  1. Add vegetable scraps to a saucepan. Cook on medium to high heat for 8–15 minutes, stirring often, until golden brown.
  2. Add brown sugar to pan and cook until sugar melts.
  3. Add vegetable scraps to a large pot and cover them with water.
  4. Bring water to a boil. When water reaches boiling, reduce to a simmer.
  5. Let the pot simmer for 45 minutes to one hour, but no longer. (The longer you cook the vegetables in water, the more bitter the stock.)
  6. Strain stock and allow to cool.
  7. Freeze stock in jars or ice cube trays, or use right away to make rice, cook pasta, boil soup, or prepare a vegetable sauté.
Lisa Suriano
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About Lisa Suriano
Lisa Suriano is a certified nutritionist who holds a Master’s Degree in Nutrition and Food Science and specializes in school food service as the Director of Operations for J.C. Food, a premier school food service consulting company for independent schools. Lisa founded the evidence-based, culinary-nutrition education program Veggiecation®, which introduces thousands of children and families to the delicious world of vegetables. She is thrilled to partner with Healthfirst to help introduce practical and palate-pleasing ideas for incorporating more fresh fruits and vegetables into the lives of the community! 
 

© 2019 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

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