Five Ways to Deal With Summer Allergies

Does summer leave you sniffling, itching, coughing, and sneezing? Here’s why, and what you can do about it.

July 20, 2016 | HF Healthy Living Team

If you find yourself with a runny nose and red eyes when the season changes, it may be because of allergies.

Seasonal allergies caused by pollen—also known as “hay fever”—can happen at the start of summer, spring, and fall, when plants give off pollen grains that are carried around by the wind. Most of the pollens that cause allergies come from trees, weeds, and grass.

No matter where they come from, pollen grains can cause allergic reactions that are unpleasant and uncomfortable.

Click on the images below to learn how you can help prevent seasonal allergies and feel better, faster if you have them.

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Stay Inside

 

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Allergy symptoms will likely be at their worst on dry, windy days when plants are blooming and pollen levels are high. Rain helps lower pollen levels in the air and will clean off sidewalks and cars, so wait until after a rainfall to go outside.

 
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Check the Pollen Count

 

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The amount of pollen in the air is called the pollen count. When the pollen count is high, allergies will be worse. Go here to check your local pollen count, and use the reported levels to better plan and prepare for your day.

 
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Stay Clean

 

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Reduce the amount of pollen you breathe in by changing your clothes and showering when you come home. Wash your sheets and linens often, dry your clothes in a machine rather than outside on a line, and vacuum and dust your home—maybe while you wait for the rain to stop (or start)!

 
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Take a Pill

 

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Medicines called antihistamines and decongestants, which often come in pill form or are sometimes available as a nasal spray, can help with sneezing, coughing, itchy eyes, and other symptoms caused by allergies. Always talk to your doctor first before taking a new medicine.

 
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See Your Doctor

 

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If your allergies are still unbearable, talk to your doctor about other solutions. S/he may be able to help assess and treat your allergy symptoms using tests and therapies that work best for you.

 

© 2016 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“Hay Fever,” Mayo Clinic. December 29, 2015.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hay-fever/in-depth/seasonal-allergies/art-20048343?pg=1

“Pollen Allergy,” Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. October 2015.
http://www.aafa.org/page/pollen-allergy.aspx

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