Five Tips to Help Your Child with Reading

Reading is important for a child’s overall development. Check out these tips to help your child enjoy reading and excel in school.

February 15, 2017 | HF Healthy Living Team

Reading is very important to your child’s development. It can help improve memory, concentration, and much more—just to name some of the reasons.

If you’re looking for ways to help your child with reading, or to make reading a bigger part of his or her life, click the photos below to learn more.

Take a Trip
to the Local Library

Find a local library near you and make a day of it. Let your children pick their favorite books to bring home. Plus, most local libraries in New York are free. Find your local library here.

 

Reward Reading

Set goals for how often or how much your children should read. When they meet those goals, treat them to something like a sleepover with friends or a movie night. You can even take them places to make reading even more exciting, like a children’s book signing and author meet-up.

 

Make Reading Fun

Studies have shown that children learn better when they’re having fun. Social interaction when reading to your child helps. Try to change your voice with each character, explain the pictures, or have your child draw their own pictures for the story.

 

Let Them See
You Reading

Observation is a powerful learning tool for children. Seeing you read and write is healthy for their growth and development.

 

It’s Never Too
Early to Start

Although toddlers and older children will absorb more, babies will still love to hear your voice when you’re reading too. You can look at board books for children ages newborn to three, and picture or novelty books for ages three to eight.

 
 

Check out some reading programs and places to get free books near you to get started!

 

© 2017 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“Why Reading is Good for the Brain,” MSN. February 29, 2016.
http://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/mindandbody/why-reading-is-good-for-the-brain/ar-AAdUrDU

“Early Learning Guidelines,” New York Works for Children. Accessed January 27, 2017.
http://ccf.ny.gov/files/7813/8177/1285/ELG.pdf

“The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Bond: Focus on Children in Poverty,” American Academy of Pediatrics. January 2012.
hhttps://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/1/e204

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