Five Quick Tips to Stop Sugar Cravings

Are you having a hard time avoiding sugar? We’re here to help you stop sugar cravings with some easy tips to follow. Find out now.

April 17, 2018 | HF Healthy Living Team

Most people can benefit from a sugar detox. Evidence has shown that sugar is not only addicting, but that an excessive amount can cause or worsen kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and even fatty liver disease.

Sugar creates a reward and craving in the brain. It’s been proven to have addictive qualities comparable with those of certain drugs, according to several studies by the National Institutes of Health. Because of this, it can be challenging to wean yourself off of sugar, but we’re here to help.

Whether sugar is hiding in drinks or snacks or you’re indulging in sweets, cut sugar from your favorite meals today.

Click the photos below to get some quick tips on how to stop your sugar cravings in their tracks.

Get the Right Nutrients

 

Sugar cravings can often stem from a lack of specific nutrients and vitamins. Common nutrient deficiencies that cause sugar cravings are zinc, magnesium, and omega 3s. Be sure you’re getting the right amount of fruits, vegetables, protein, and fiber at each meal to help curb sugar cravings.

 

Take an Epsom Salt Bath

 

Many people crave chocolate, but why? Some evidence suggests it might not just be the taste and the sugar, but also the magnesium. Epsom salt is a form of magnesium. Magnesium can also regulate blood sugar, improve muscle soreness, lessen arthritis pain, and more.

 

Have a Healthy
Snack Handy

 

When someone in your office brings in a cake or donuts, be prepared with your own healthy snacks. Indulge in some sweets if you’d like, but having a snack on hand will help you switch to that and not want seconds. You can try some celery or carrots with hummus or these healthy on-the-go snacks.

 

Get Excited
About Your Meals

 

Just because you might be cutting down on sweets doesn’t mean you have to neglect flavor. Try some of these healthy meals today. A smoothie with some fruit or a sweet chickpea salad will give you the natural sugar from the fruit, as well as some vitamins and minerals your body might be craving.

 

Swap Out Refined Carbs

 

Do you indulge often in bagels, white rice, or white bread instead of donuts? Refined white flour and carbs break down into simple sugars in the body. They give the same crash and blood sugar spike as a sugary treat. Swap out your white breads for whole grain or even gluten-free bread to see a difference.

 
 

© 2018 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program.

Sources
“Magnesium in Man: Implications for Health and Disease,” National Institutes of Health. January 2015.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25540137

“Sugar Addiction: Pushing the Drug-Sugar Analogy to the Limit,” National Institutes of Health. July 2013.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Sugar+addiction%3A+pushing+the+drug-sugar+analogy+to+the+limit

“Evidence for Sugar Addiction,” National Institutes of Health. May 18, 2007.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Evidence+for+sugar+addiction%3A+Behavioral+and+neurochemical+effects+of+intermittent%2C+excessive+sugar+intake

“Sugar and Fat: Cravings and Aversions,” The Journal of Nutrition. March 3, 2003.
https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/133/3/835S/4688015

“Hypomagnesemia and Obesity in Relation to Insulin Resistance and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients,” Ebscohost. July 2011.
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/67673292/hypomagnesemia-obesity-relation-insulin-resistance-glycemic-control-type-2-diabetic-patients

“Chocolate: Food or Drug?,” National Institutes of Health. 1999.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10524390

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