Five Questions to Ask Your Child’s Doctor

Well-child visits can go by quickly. Make sure you ask these important questions at your child’s next checkup.

November 04, 2016 | HF Healthy Living Team

There are questions you should ask before choosing your child’s doctor, but what should you cover when you arrive at the doctor’s office?

Click the photos below to learn more and get the most out of your child’s well-child visit.

What can I do to improve
my child’s overall health?

 

Ask questions about your child’s eating habits, exercise, nutrition, or anything else that might be a concern. If you are helping your child manage a health condition, make sure the doctor is up-to-date on your child’s medications, latest symptoms, or other issues.

 

Is my child developing
at a typical rate?

 

About 13% of children ages 3–17 in the U.S. have a developmental or behavioral disability. Ask your child’s doctor about their development and if there is a need to see a specialist. You can also download a milestone checklist here to better prepare for your visit.

 

Can I do anything to
improve my child’s social
or emotional well-being?

 

Bring up any questions regarding family problems, or even concerns about your child’s emotional health. Your child’s doctor may be able to refer him or her to a specialist.

 

Is my child up-to-date with
all of the necessary vaccines?

 

Vaccines are important to prevent disease. Help your child stay safe—be sure to ask the doctor if your child has the vaccines he or she needs.

 

Do I need to follow
up with anything?

 

Your doctor will go over a lot of important information in a short amount of time. Don’t be shy—ask any questions that might come up during the checkup. Also, ask the doctor if your child needs a follow-up visit and, if so, when.

 

Your child’s health and well-being are important, but so are yours. Ask your doctor the necessary questions at your own appointment as well.

 

© 2016 HF Management Services, LLC.

Healthfirst is the brand name used for products and services provided by one or more of the Healthfirst group of affiliated companies.

This health information or program is for educational purposes only and not intended to treat, diagnose, or act as a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Consult your healthcare provider and always follow your healthcare provider’s instructions.

Sources
“Developmental Monitoring and Screening,” CDC. Accessed July 5, 2016.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/screening.html

“You and Your Child’s Doctor,” NCBI. Accessed July 6, 2016.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2706637/

“Developmental Milestones,” CDC. Accessed July 6, 2016.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/index.html

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